Freetronics: Arduino-Compatible Electronics Kits & Parts

Here at Freetronics we design, sell and support our range of flexible, easy to use boards and modules, making it easy for you to build your own electronic projects.

What Is Arduino? Arduino is a very popular and easy to use programmable board for creating your own projects. Consisting of a simple hardware platform and a free source code editor with an easy “one-click compile/upload” feature, it’s designed to be really easy to use without being an expert programmer. Arduino is also the most popular microcontroller board for advanced users and all kinds of more ambitious projects.... Read more

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Arduino Kits Online

Looking for an Arduino kit online then you have come to the right place. We design, sell and supply electronic components which are arduino components.
For Arduino kits in Melbourne then always go for Freetronics.

Arduino parts online

If you need Arduino parts online our store has a wide range of kits and parts. Arduino melbourne, arduino uno, arduino duemilanove usb

Arduino duemilanove

We have lots of Arduino electronic components like ethernet shield, arduino mega usb and buy usbdroid

Microcontroller Boards

We sell a huge range of microcontroller boards which will be compatible with adruino electronic components

News

April 24, 2014

Make a huge Bluetooth-connected display with Arduino

We love large displays, and the following version described by Instructables member kenyer is quite original and useful once constructed. They wanted some very large 7-segment displays, and instead of using a commercial product - created their own with a 3D printer which allows for the segments to be displayed with groups of LEDs.

This allows for a large, bright display which is also controlled with a simple Android app that communicates between the display and Android device via a serial/Bluetooth link. A perfect method of control once the display has been mounted for normal use. A quick demonstration of the display is shown in the following video:

For complete details on how to make your own version, check out the display InstructableAnd for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Need a large, Arduino-compatible display - but don't want to make your own from scratch? Then check out our Freetronics Dot Matrix Displays. They're simple to use, yet very bright for indoor and outdoor situations. Available in various colours, the 32 x 16 LED matrix can display text and graphics quite easily - and can be daisy-chained together for extended displays. For more information, see our range of Dot Matrix Displays here

April 24, 2014

Build an Arduino-powered RGB LED Cube

It's always great to see people building various LED cubes that are driven by an Arduino, and a new example has been published by Emiliano Valencia. His version is a full RGB LED configuration and driven by an Arduino-compatible circuit and TLC5940 constant-current LED driver ICs.

Building your own cube successfully requires a great amount of patience and accuracy, and this has been demonstrated by Emiliano in his tutorial as he explains how to keep the cube lined up during assembly. 

However as you can see from the image above, the final project is quite successful - so visit his Instructable for complete details. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're interested in building your own cube - but from a convenient and proven design - check out our new CUBE4: RGB LED cube kit:


It's easy to construct and use, and with an onboard Arduino-compatible board the cube can be used to display all sorts of data or create visual effects. It's easily controlled via simple text commands via the USB port - or write your own Arduino sketch. It's incredibly customisable and there's so much more. For more information and to order, visit the CUBE4 page. 

 

April 23, 2014

Digitise books with a Raspberry Pi and LEGO Mindstorms

In what can only be described as a whole bunch of awesome, the folks at Dexter Industries have demonstrated a system to digitise books based on some simple and easy-to-find hardware, namely LEGO and a Raspberry Pi. The RPi can easily control the LEGO to flip and hold down the book pages, and then use a camera to capture each page as an image. Finally with some OCR software the page is digitised for digital storage - or used for text-to-speech. You can see this through the following video:

Apart from having a lot of fun, this would be an inexpensive method of creating audio files for the visually-impaired or blind. For more information, visit the project tutorial site. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking for a more permanent way to mount circuitry to your Raspberry Pi, check out our new PiBreak - the prototyping board for the Raspberry Pi. It provides labelled breakout pins for all GPIOs, a large prototyping area with solder pads, and power rails for easy power connection:

Furthermore the PiBreak also includes mounting hardware to firmly attach it to your Raspberry Pi using a nut, bolt, and spacer - and is compatible with all revisions of both model A and B Raspberry Pi computers. For more information about our new PiBreak board, our Getting Started guide, and to order - visit the product page

April 23, 2014

Make an Arduino Multimeter Shield

It's always interesting to see people make their own test equipment based on the Arduino platform, and the following example by Milen Penev is a great workable example. Milen's shield allows for measurement of not only voltage and current, it also includes resistance, transistor beta and more. 

Even if you're not interested in making your own, this is an interesting tutorial that explains some theory behind test and measurement - and if you do wish to make your own, Milen has provided the EAGLE files to download and have your own shield PCB manufactured. Finally a quick demonstration is shown in the following video:

Kudos to Milen for such an great Instructable, which can be found here. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you need to add external hardware or devices to your next Arduino project, you'll need a protoshield to mount the external circuitry. In doing so, consider our range of ProtoShields. From the tiny LeoStick to the Mega.

April 23, 2014

Build a Spotify remote control with Arduino

Arduino enthusiasts who use the Spotify streaming music service via their Windows-based PCs will find this project by the Hackshed of interest. Their remote control involves a small .NET application that interfaces between Spotify and the serial port (USB) to which the LCD-equipped Arduino is connected. It can then send music data to the Arduino, and also listen for serial commands from the Arduino to be interpreted as control instructions. 

All the required code for .NET and the Arduino sketch are provided - so you can learn more about interfacing the two platforms at the Hackshed website. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Looking for a rapid-use LCD for your Arduino or compatible projects? Save time and move forward with the Freetronics LCD & Keypad shield which contains a bright 16x2 character LCD and five buttons that can be read from only one analog input pin:

April 16, 2014

Using Arduino to automate iPad game-playing

And now for something completely different - Uli Kilian has used the Arduino platform to automate the paying of the iPad game "Jurassic Park". Although this may seem like a fruitless pursuit, success in the game requries a high level of interaction - or paying for in-app purchases.

Thus Uli's device is programmed to press the required areas on the iPad screen to simulate user input. The system is created from LEGO Technics parts, and deftly moves and touches the iPad as shown in the following video:

So if you're really into these sorts of games, a system such as Uli's could be run overnight to help your play move forward. For more information, visit the article on Wired. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well. 

Have you been reading about Arduino and would like to understand more so you can work with projects like the example above, but not sure where to start? Then order one of our Experimenter's Kit for Arduino: 

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. 

However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

April 16, 2014

Program ATtiny85s from a Raspberry Pi

After wanting to get into AVR programming - but not wanting to buy a dedicated programmer, Instructables member prb3333 came up with a solution based on the Raspberry Pi. The software side is simple, as the required toolchain and drivers for the SPI bus can be downloaded. The hardware can simply be connected to the GPIO pins of the Pi board, or fitted to a neat prototyping shield with an IC socket. 

Just remember that the Raspberry Pi is a 3.3V board - in case you're doing some in-circuit programming. For complete instructions, visit the project's Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking for a more permanent way to mount circuitry to your Raspberry Pi, check out our new PiBreak - the prototyping board for the Raspberry Pi. It provides labelled breakout pins for all GPIOs, a large prototyping area with solder pads, and power rails for easy power connection:

Furthermore the PiBreak also includes mounting hardware to firmly attach it to your Raspberry Pi using a nut, bolt, and spacer - and is compatible with all revisions of both model A and B Raspberry Pi computers. For more information about our new PiBreak board, our Getting Started guide, and to order - visit the product page

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