Freetronics: Arduino-Compatible Electronics Kits & Parts

Here at Freetronics we design, sell and support our range of flexible, easy to use boards and modules, making it easy for you to build your own electronic projects.

What Is Arduino? Arduino is a very popular and easy to use programmable board for creating your own projects. Consisting of a simple hardware platform and a free source code editor with an easy “one-click compile/upload” feature, it’s designed to be really easy to use without being an expert programmer. Arduino is also the most popular microcontroller board for advanced users and all kinds of more ambitious projects.... Read more

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Arduino Kits Online

Looking for an Arduino kit online then you have come to the right place. We design, sell and supply electronic components which are arduino components.
For Arduino kits in Melbourne then always go for Freetronics.

Arduino parts online

If you need Arduino parts online our store has a wide range of kits and parts. Arduino melbourne, arduino uno, arduino duemilanove usb

Arduino duemilanove

We have lots of Arduino electronic components like ethernet shield, arduino mega usb and buy usbdroid

Microcontroller Boards

We sell a huge range of microcontroller boards which will be compatible with adruino electronic components

News

September 02, 2014

The Arduino-powered illuminated Poker Table

If you're a Poker-playing Arduino enthusiast then the following project by Justin Trzeciak will be of interest. He's modified a typical card table by adding a networked Arduino that can control RGB LEDs mounted in front of each player's position. The illuminations are used to indicate the status of each player, or just be controlled for a visual effect.

The system is controlled via a web page which is hosted on a local server that's connected to the Arduino, and allows for simple control from a smartphone or other web-connected device on the local network.

Even if you're not interested in card games, this project offers a neat framework for controlling connected Arduino-based projects. To get started, more information and links to the code - visit Justin's table website. And for more, we're on facebook, twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking to make your own colourful LED-based project, consider our Freetronics RGBLED: full colour module. It includes a bright RGB LED on the top of the board and a WS2801 constant-current, addressable, multi-channel LED driver on the back. This smart module can be daisy-chained, so you can connect a number of these together in a string and drive each of the module colours individually from your microcontroller. For more information and to order, visit the product page.

September 02, 2014

Build an Arduino-powered Pill Reminder clock

For some people the process of remembering to take their medication on the correct time of day can be a challenge, and no doubt a worry for family members or friends when helping them in their daily activities. However with the help of the Arduino platform and the following project by Instructables member jschrempp you can make your own pill reminder which is neat and easy to use.

The system uses an Arduino Uno or compatible board and a custom-made shield to control the LCD, control buttons and indicator LEDs to alert the user as to which pill box ot open and consume the contents. Furthermore the laser-cut enclosure gives a usable appearance and keeps the electronics away from harm. The creator runs through the unit in the following video:

A fantastic solution to a common problem, and one that can be modified at will. You can find the details including PCB and more from the project Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebooktwitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

The most important part of any clock or timer-based project is the inclusion of an accurate real-time clock IC. Here at Freetronics we have the Maxim DS3232 real-time clock IC module:

Apart from keeping accurate time for years due to the temperature-controlled oscillator and having a tiny coin-cell for backup, it is very simple to connect to your Arduino project. A driver library allows your program to easily set or read the time and date. Perfect for clock projects, dataloggers or anything that needs to know the date and time. Furthermore it contains a digital thermometer and 236 bytes of non-volatile memory to store user settings and other data. For more information, check out the module page here.

September 01, 2014

Easily monitor household events with an Arduino

Thanks to a busy life we can often forget simple things - such as if an outside garag door is closed, or be waiting for the mail and not want to walk out and check the box every half an hour. Instructables member BrianH who uses two simple sensors which are monitored with an Arduino-compatible circuit to keep track of outside events.

A light sensor is fitted inside his letterbox to detect the mail, and a reed switch and magnet is used to monitor the status of the garage door. The neat thing is that the system will beep once every ten minutes as a polite reminder to close the garage door, or you can reset or otherwise control this through the code. And with a little effort it can be fitted in a neat enclosure that wouldn't look too much out of place:

To learn about this project page including the code and schematic, visit the Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking for an Arduino Uno-compatible board for various projects, choose what tens of thousands of others have done and use our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs: 

September 01, 2014

Simple home automation with an iPhone and Raspberry Pi

There are literally thousands of combinations and permutatations of hardware and software you can use to enable varying levels of home automation, and another example has been documented by Instructables member Samuel LIU whose system allows for an iPhone to control power outlets over a local WAN.

Usually any mention of an iPhone will give some people a headache, however in this instance the code is written using pythonista, a python IDE for iOS. This can then send commands back to a Raspberry Pi which controls a relay module via GPIO. And thus the outlet and in this example a lamp can be controlled from the phone, for example:

Although it's a simple demonstration, this project gives you the framework for another home automation option from a popular handheld device. For mode details, visit the project Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you need to connect external circuitry to your Raspberry Pi such as the relay control project above, consider our PiBreak board. It provides labelled breakout pins for all GPIOs, a large prototyping area with solder pads, and power rails for easy power connection:

Furthermore the PiBreak also includes mounting hardware to firmly attach it to your Raspberry Pi using a nut, bolt, and spacer - and is compatible with all revisions of both model A and B Raspberry Pi computers. For more information about our PiBreak board, our Getting Started guide, and to order - visit the product page.

September 01, 2014

Build a Foot-controlled USB Keyboard with Arduino

If you're always looking for more efficient methods of entering repetitive keyboard commands, then the following project by Arduino forum member matmanj will be of interest. They've harnessed the ability of an Arduino to emulate a USB keyboard, and used this to build a secondary macro keyboard that can be used with your feet.

Consisting of eight larger buttons, each of which can be programmed to send a sequence of keystrokes back to the PC - the foot keyboard would be quite useful for those repetitive situations or even mashing out commands in hurry with your favourite game.

The key to success would be finding some strong, perhaps arcade-quality switches for a long useful life. Nevertheless, for complete details and the sketch - log in to the Arduino forum. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Need a small Arduino-compatible for use with your own projects? Then check out out our LeoStick. It's the Arduino Leonardo-compatible board that's cheaper and smaller than the original:

 Apart from being one of the smallest Arduino-compatibles on the market with USB, it also has an onboard RGB LED and piezo which can be used a knock sensor and various tune and sound effects. Plus you can add extra circuitry with the matching protostick! For more information and to order, click here.

August 28, 2014

Make a wearable Tetris T-Shirt

We don't mean a t-shirt with a picture of the game, instead a masterpiece of wearable electronics that is a Tetris game in a t-shirt. Created by Marc Kerger, the Arduino-compatible circuit and lots of RGB LEDs are fitted inside the shirt, allowing the light to shine through with an outstanding effect, as shown in the following video:

Although not all the colours of the LEDs have been used, with some extra coding this could be made possible. Marc has used the code from the original Pumpkin Tetris that we highlighted a while ago with great success.

The only problem would be dealing with players who are too enthusiastic with the buttons. Nevertheless for more discussion about the project and some updates, check out Marc's YouTube page. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

Need a small Arduino-compatible for use with your own projects? Then check out out our LeoStick. It's the Arduino Leonardo-compatible board that's cheaper and smaller than the original:

 Apart from being one of the smallest Arduino-compatibles on the market with USB, it also has an onboard RGB LED and piezo which can be used a knock sensor and various tune and sound effects. Plus you can add extra circuitry with the matching protostick! For more information and to order, click here.

 

August 28, 2014

Build you own Quiz Game Show Controls

If you have family game night or run competitions such as quiz shows or trivia nights, then enthusiast David Caplette's project will be of interest. It's a fully self-contained quiz game buzzer system that's perfect for keeping scores of four players, and also quite adaptable for customisation.

Based around an Arduino-compatible circuit, it has four external player buttons that are enclosed in strong wooden boxes - ideal for enthusiastic players. And once the fastest player has pressed their button, the other thee are locked out by the system to keep gameplay fair. For a full demonstration check out the following video:

A great project that makes game play fairer and more accurate - for complete details visit David's Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebook, twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well. 

If you're wanting to make your own Arduino-compatible project such as the game show system above, you'll need an ATmega328P MCU with Arduino Uno bootloader:

This is the same Atmel AVR ATmega328P microcontroller used in the official Arduino Uno, as well as our ElevenEtherTenUSBDroid, and other boards. Perfect for building your own Arduino-compatible project directly on a breadboard or on a custom PCB, or for replacing the MCU in an existing board. Comes with the Arduino Uno bootloader pre-installed. Better still, it even has a special label stuck on top with details of the pinout, so you don't even need to look up the datasheet when connecting it up in your project! For more information and to order, click here!

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