Freetronics: Arduino-Compatible Electronics Kits & Parts

Here at Freetronics we design, sell and support our range of flexible, easy to use boards and modules, making it easy for you to build your own electronic projects.

What Is Arduino? Arduino is a very popular and easy to use programmable board for creating your own projects. Consisting of a simple hardware platform and a free source code editor with an easy “one-click compile/upload” feature, it’s designed to be really easy to use without being an expert programmer. Arduino is also the most popular microcontroller board for advanced users and all kinds of more ambitious projects.... Read more

More Information

Arduino Kits Online

Looking for an Arduino kit online then you have come to the right place. We design, sell and supply electronic components which are arduino components.
For Arduino kits in Melbourne then always go for Freetronics.

Arduino parts online

If you need Arduino parts online our store has a wide range of kits and parts. Arduino melbourne, arduino uno, arduino duemilanove usb

Arduino duemilanove

We have lots of Arduino electronic components like ethernet shield, arduino mega usb and buy usbdroid

Microcontroller Boards

We sell a huge range of microcontroller boards which will be compatible with adruino electronic components

News

August 20, 2014

Make your own Arduino-powered MIDI Bass Pedals

After purchasing an older Hammon M2 organ and being dissatisfied with the sounds from the pedals, Ron Czarnik refurbished and remounted them into the housing of a child's piano to create a fantastic MIDI-compatible instrument with the help of an Arduino.

Although the original pedal circuit design was somewhat daunting, with some research Ron has converted them to simple switches so they can be read by the Arduino's digital inputs - at which point the MIDI translation and output can easily be created. Finally the new enclosure is a work of art, as shown in the following video:

A great use of some older parts which have been converted into something new - for complete details visit the project Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking for an Arduino Uno-compatible board for various projects, choose what tens of thousands of others have done and use our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs: 

August 20, 2014

Voice-controlled Home Automation with Raspberry Pi

If there's one thing that movies of the 20th century promised - it was voice control of everything at our whim. Although this hasn't become overly prevalent in today's home - you can create your own system with some effort and add voice control to all manner of devices around the home with the help of a Raspberry Pi.

This has been demonstrated by Prince Stevie-Ray Charles Balabis who uses Steven Hickson's Voice Control software in order to trigger wireless 433 MHz power outlets. Thanks to using wireless outlets the system can be completed with a minimum of hardware and zero mains-rated wiring, keeping things safe. The system works very well, as Prince has demonstrated in the following video:

With some imagination and a little effort much more could be controlled with the software, so to get started visit Prince's interesting website. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you need to connect external circuitry to your Raspberry Pi, consider our PiBreak board. It provides labelled breakout pins for all GPIOs, a large prototyping area with solder pads, and power rails for easy power connection:

Furthermore the PiBreak also includes mounting hardware to firmly attach it to your Raspberry Pi using a nut, bolt, and spacer - and is compatible with all revisions of both model A and B Raspberry Pi computers. For more information about our new PiBreak board, our Getting Started guide, and to order - visit the product page.

August 19, 2014

Build a huge Arduino-powered Domino Clock

After being inspired by a similar project, Instructables member stregoi decided to recreate their own verison (and at a lower cost) of a large Domino Clock. This type of clock uses three huge dominos, each of which represent a digit in the current time.

The dots for the numbers are usually commerically-available flip-dots, however due to the cost the creator has made their own versions complete with small home-made electromagnets. This has been a success and quite easy to replicate if you have the time, and the final example is pleasing to the eye, for example:

Controllin the dots is simple with high-power shift register ICs which is explained along with construction and sketch details on the clock's Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebooktwitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

The most important part of any clock project is the inclusion of an accurate real-time clock IC. Here at Freetronics we have the Maxim DS3232 real-time clock IC module:

Apart from keeping accurate time for years due to the temperature-controlled oscillator and having a tiny coin-cell for backup, it is very simple to connect to your Arduino project. A driver library allows your program to easily set or read the time and date. Perfect for clock projects, dataloggers or anything that needs to know the date and time. Furthermore it contains a digital thermometer and 236 bytes of non-volatile memory to store user settings and other data. For more information, check out the module page here.

August 19, 2014

The Drinking Bird "Flock Clock"

Next in our series of interesting Arduino-powered clock projects is the "Flock Clock" by Mike Rigsby. His adaption of a clock uses an incredibly original method of displaying the time, by using twelve "drinking birds" - each of which can be triggered to move by a peltier unit underneath each of their bases.

The time is then displayed by moving each bird, whose number of movements can be interpreted into a binary number and then the time of day. Mike gives us a quick demonstration of the clock in the following video:

As an Arduino can't handle the current required for each peltier, relays are used to switch the high current for each unit. Certainly an orginal design, for which you can find all the details on the project page. And for more, we're on facebook, twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well. 

If you're looking for a simple way to control many relays from your Arduino, without using up all your digital I/O pins - check out our RELAY8: driver shield:

So what is the RELAY8:? It's an Arduino shield that allows you to drive up to 8 relays from your Arduino using just 2 I/O pins with this shield. It communicates with your board using I2C, so you can even stack several shields together to drive 16, 24, or more outputs! Includes back-EMF protection and works with a wide range of relays. Perfect for home automation projects! For more information and to order, click here

August 18, 2014

An Arduino-powered Pulse Oximeter

Now and again an interesting project appears that is based on the concept of measuring the vital signs of the user, and one example has been brought to our attention - a pulse oximeter and heart rate monitor by Arduino forum member die_Diode.

It uses two Arduino-compatibles in this neat device which uses some clever analogue circuitry to monitor the level of oxygen saturation and also the heart rate of the user. The finished project looks great and according to the creator is quite accurate when compared to a commercially-available machine.

Please note that although making such a device is an excellent educational project, you should rely on the advice of medical professionals and also call for help if your heart rate or other conditions take a turn for the worse. However for more information about the device, visit the Arduino forum. And for more, we're on facebook, twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well. 

If you're wanting to make your own Arduino-compatible project such as the pulse oximeter above, you'll need an ATmega328P MCU with Arduino Uno bootloader:

This is the same Atmel AVR ATmega328P microcontroller used in the official Arduino Uno, as well as our ElevenEtherTenUSBDroid, and other boards. Perfect for building your own Arduino-compatible project directly on a breadboard or on a custom PCB, or for replacing the MCU in an existing board. Comes with the Arduino Uno bootloader pre-installed. Better still, it even has a special label stuck on top with details of the pinout, so you don't even need to look up the datasheet when connecting it up in your project! For more information and to order, click here!

August 18, 2014

Experimenting with voice-controlled Arduino projects

Voice recognition is generally though to be outside the realm of the Arduino world, however with some help it can become a reality. Usuall this involved an expensive shield with dedicated voice-recognition microcontrollers - however if your project can be located near a PC then things become much easier. This has been demonstrated by Saurabh Vyas who created a voice-controlled RGB lamp using an Arduino and a PC running his custom VB.net application.

The PC takes care of all the voice recognition, and simply sends the resulting commands as text down the USB/serial to the Arduino. This offloads all the work to the PC, and allows the Arduino to shine in its role as the hardware controller. It's a win-win that works very well, for example the following video:

You can learn about Saurabh's lamp including the code and notes from his Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebook, twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're looking to make your own colourful LED-based project, consider our Freetronics RGBLED: full colour module. It includes a bright RGB LED on the top of the board and a WS2801 constant-current, addressable, multi-channel LED driver on the back. This smart module can be daisy-chained, so you can connect a number of these together in a string and drive each of the module colours individually from your microcontroller. For more information and to order, visit the product page.

August 14, 2014

Hack an Apple Time Capsule with a Raspberry Pi

After coming across a first-generation Apple Time Capsule (a device with a hard drive which automatically backs up data from a Mac) that was worse for wear, Instructables member hitekmike brought it back to useful life by converting it to a Raspberry Pi-driven equivalent.

To do so required a small amount of hardware modification, however with a new hard drive, power cabling and replacing the colour of the LED for subjective reasons, the Time Capsue is brought back to life under control of the Raspberry Pi. Plus it also doubles as a classy enclosure for the single-board computer. For a very well documented process of hacking, check out the project Instructable page. And for more, we're on facebookGoogle+, and twitter - so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you need to connect external circuitry to your Raspberry Pi, consider our PiBreak board. It provides labelled breakout pins for all GPIOs, a large prototyping area with solder pads, and power rails for easy power connection:

Furthermore the PiBreak also includes mounting hardware to firmly attach it to your Raspberry Pi using a nut, bolt, and spacer - and is compatible with all revisions of both model A and B Raspberry Pi computers. For more information about our new PiBreak board, our Getting Started guide, and to order - visit the product page.

Find us on Google+